logo
Today is   Last update 07-11-2011
 















Going West.......and South West

The Society arranged one of its regular two-day excursions for August 30th and 31st in 1881. Members were to be exploring West Cumberland and using Egremont as a base. The fixture was to prove quite eventful.....

*After assembling on Tuesday afternoon, the party was taken in carriages to Calder Abbey; the drivers let members alight, then drove off to Calderbridge. After the abbey had been inspected, 'A walk along the romantic path by the Calder brought the party to St. Bridget's, Calderbridge, the attraction there being a curious stone slab, which has already been described in these Transactions'.

*Re-united with the carriages, the party then headed for Gosforth, where the church and famous cross were duly examined. At the end of the visit, there was 'some little delay' involving the carriages; however, at last the party set off for Seascale Hall.

Gosforth Viking Cross
Gosforth Viking Cross


*Members gathered in a field adjoining the Hall so that Mr. Jackson could point out that the field 'was surrounded on three sides by water', and 'well adapted for a fortification'. As it 'must have been close to the Roman way to the various camps along the coast, he thought it not unlikely that it might have been the site of a camp'.

Now, a member of the CWAAS Council had with permission visited the field 'an hour or two before the party reached it' in order to 'test this supposition'. He 'had made a series of excavations on a small scale in various parts of the field'. Then we read the outcome of these endeavours:

'...his labours had met with no reward, no stonework being discovered'.

Even today, of course, many people interested in archaeology can see such an outcome only as 'no reward'. But in fact there was a very clear reward: the possibility at the centre of Mr. Jackson's pet theory had been tested, and now it was known that the field was NOT the site of a camp; so the field as a site of a camp could now be eliminated - which surely was progress in terms of archaeological knowledge.

*The next point of call was the Old Church of St Bridget; but things went quite seriously amiss at this stage.

The driver of the third carriage missed his road in Beckermet, took a wrong turn, and arrived back in Egremont, the carriages behind him dutifully following his lead! Thus only a limited party enjoyed a precious opportunity to inspect the crosses at the church.

What made the situation more tantalising was the fact that the Vicar had had the crosses 'carefully opened up, the sods, soil, and stones being removed so as to shew their bases to their foundations', thus revealing various holes and marks which the Vicar thought had 'not been alluded to in any other description of the crosses' that he had seen. He had also had stone slabs within the Communion rails lifted, this apparently revealing part of 'a pre-Reformation altar'. The careful note quoted here had been supplied to the editor by the Vicar himself.

As you can imagine, things back in Egremont were quite fraught!

Egremont Castle
Egremont Castle


*The programme for the second day of the excursion included a visit to Egremont church and Castle, after which members travelled by train to Ravenglass, to see the Roman remains 'known as Walls Castle'.

Ravenglass Roman Bathhouse
Ravenglass Roman Bathhouse


*Finally, we have a glimpse of a way of running a railway that was very different from that of our own day: 'At Ravenglass Station the fast train passing about six o'clock was stopped to take up the party.'!

A case of having friends and influencing people!

Ravenglass Station  (Photo via Wikipedia)
Ravenglass Station (Photo via Wikipedia)









































Getting a new Society off the ground.....
...More
YES! Colour illustrations in the nineteenth century!
...More
Who would be an organiser???
...More
You want adventure? How about this, in 1889?
...More
VOREDA - Ebay of bygone days?
...More
In the swim!
...More
What's your tipple?
...More
Postscript to becoming 'A Society in Union'
...More
Crying wolf.....
...More
Whether the weather be fine or.....
...More
This is the life! Doing your research in style!
...More
The things you find in cupboards!
...More
MEAT AND DRINK I
...More
MEAT AND DRINK II
...More
It's a washout!
...More
UP, UP, AND AWAY!
...More
WAXING LYRICAL!
...More
RUN OF THE MILL? NOT LIKELY!!!
...More
BUILDING THE LEGACY: WE'VE INHERITED
...More
Enclosure Award 1775 - For Great and Little Stainton, Newbiggin and Blencow, Barony of Greystock
...More
Northern England and Southern Scotland in the Central Middle Ages
...More
...More
Carlisle Cathedral Library Conservation Project
...More
Jonas Barber, Clockmaker
...More
The Rise & Fall of the Northumbrian Kingdom
...More
AGM and Members' 20th Anniversary Talks
...More
The Derwentwater Disaster
...More
Excavations at Stainton West
...More
The Ancient Woodlands of Cumbria
...More
Space and Dissent - evidence from Lancaster Castle (Study Day)
...More
Northern Names – regional aspects of the names of places and people
...More
The History of Coniston Copper Mines
...More
Travels of an archaeologist
...More
Archaeological fieldwork, descovery and incident in 2017.
...More
Outside the Law
...More
17th century Time Capsule
...More
The Archaeology of Duddon Valley Longhouses
...More
45th Annual Archaeology Forum
...More
Worlds in Transformation
...More
Headlands to Headspace – Morecambe Bay
...More
The Great War – Ambleside's Story
...More
Romano-British local supply to the Roman Army in the Northwest
...More
The Oral History of Cumbria
...More
The Galloway Viking hoard
...More
The Early Maps of Cumbria
...More
ROMAN ARMY SCHOOL 2018
...More
AGM
...More
The late Iron Age royal site at Stanwick, North Yorkshire: new perspectives
...More
The Remarkable Literary History of Mirehouse
...More
A visit to Mirehouse
...More
Stone Circles of Cumbria
...More
William Brownrigg MD FRCS
...More
Lowther Estates
...More